Exchange Online: You can’t use the domain because it’s not an accepted domain for your organization

Exchange Online: You can’t use the domain because it’s not an accepted domain for your organization

One of the gotchas you may encounter when migrating mailboxes to Exchange Online is none registered Accepted Domains in Exchange Online. For example you may encounter the below error;

ERROR: Migration Permanent Exception: You can’t use the domain because it’s not an accepted domain for your organization –> You can’t use the domain because it’s not an accepted domain for your organization.

This maybe due to an email alias on a particular mailbox or all your organisation mailboxes due to an Email Address Policy. When migration to Exchange Online on you need to register all your accepted domains and remove any that may cause you the above issue.

In my case, I had domain.com registered with EXO but not extension.domain.com, as the alias was a legacy address you could be removed from the mailbox either using the Exchange Management Console or my favourite utility PowerShell.

Please ensure that Azure Active Directory has synchronize this change to your mailbox

Set-Mailbox <identity> -EmailAddresses @{remove=”<E-mail address>”}

Regards

The Author – Blogabout.Cloud


The pain in the a** that is special characters. Understanding what is and isnt supported when migrating to the Microsoft Cloud.

The pain in the a** that is special characters. Understanding what is and isnt supported when migrating to the Microsoft Cloud.

Related image

So in recent months, I have been working a number of large organisation that have issues with special characters that are affecting their migration to the Microsoft Cloud. Yes, I IDFix does an excellent job of correcting a lot of the issues. However, in recent time I have been rolled into customer sites to troubleshoot and report on special characters contained in Distribution Lists and Shared Mailboxes which cannot be migrated to Exchange Online.

What special characters are supported in Office 365?

So first of all, what is and is not supported. The below table gives an excellent break down what the character can be supported in UserNames, Password and Email Addresses.

Allowed In
Character NameCharacterUser NamePasswordEmail Address
Accent`NoYesNo
Ampersand&NoYesNo
Angle Brackets< >NoYesNo
ApostropheNoYesYes***
Asterisk*NoYesNo
At Symbol@NoYesNo
Backslash\NoYesNo
Braces[ ]NoYesNo
Brackets{ }NoYesNo
Circumflex^NoYesNo
Colon:NoYesNo
Comma,NoYesNo
Dollar Sign$NoYesNo
Equal Sign=NoYesNo
Exclamation Point!NoYesNo
HyphenYes*YesYes*
Number Sign#NoYesNo
Parentheses( )NoYesNo
Percent Symbol%NoYesNo
Period.Yes*YesYes*
Pipe|NoYesNo
Plus Sign+NoYesNo
Question Mark?NoYesNo
Quotation MarkNoYesNo
Semicolon:NoYesNo
Forward Slash/NoYesNo
Tilde~NoYesNo
Underscore_Yes**YesYes**
Uppercase Letters (A-Z)A-ZYesYesYes
Lowercase Letters (a-z)a-zYesYesYes
Numerals (0-9)0-9YesYesYes

In order to test for the special characters above I have created the following script


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cls
 $array = @('~', '!', '#', '$', '%', '^', '&amp;', '(', ')', '-', '.+', '=', '}', '{', '\', '/', '|', ';', ',', ':', '&lt;', '>', '"')
 $samaccountarray = @('[', '\', '"', '|' , ',' , '/', ':', '&lt;', '>', '+', '=', ';', ']')
 foreach ($char in $array) {
 Write-Host "Please Wait... Detecting",$char," in samaccountname" -ForegroundColor Yellow
 $objects = Get-distributiongroup
 foreach ($object in $Objects)
 {
 try {
  if ($object.SamAccountName -like "*$char*")
 {
 Write-Host "Special Character",$char,"detected in SamAccountName",$object.samaccountname -ForegroundColor Red
 
 }
 else
 {
 #Write-Host "Special Character",$char," not detected in " $object.UserPrincipalName
 }
 }
 catch
 {
 Write-Host "Great News!! we was unable to detect",$char,"in samaccountnames for all Distribution List" -ForegroundColor Green
 }
 }
 }
Get-SpecialCharacters (8 downloads)

If you are interested in understanding what IDFix does and what special characters are not supported, please see this link

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-gb/office365/enterprise/prepare-for-directory-synchronization?redirectSourcePath=%252fen-us%252farticle%252fPrepare-to-provision-users-through-directory-synchronization-to-Office-365-01920974-9e6f-4331-a370-13aea4e82b3e

Regards

The Author – Blogabout.Cloud

Configuring Data Loss Prevention for Microsoft Teams

Configuring Data Loss Prevention for Microsoft Teams

Data Loss Prevention has now been included into Microsoft but being a Skype for Business consultant have you ever configured DLP? Probably not.

So this post will look how it is configured from Start to Finish so let’s start with the standard prerequisites;

  • Office 365 Global Administrator Account

Launch Microsoft 365 Admin Center –> Select Security from under Admin Center

Admin Center

Click “More resources” and Open for Office 365 Security and Compliance Center

Click Data Loss Prevention –> Click Policy –> Click Create a policy

Data Loss Prevention

For the purpose of this post I will be creating a policy for covering UK National Insurance Numbers / Passport Numbers. DLP has a list of generic policies or you can configure a custom policy

Select –> Privacy –> Select UK Personally Identifiable Information (PII) Data –> Click Next

Polices

Click Next

Create Policy

At this stage you can select if you want to configure this policy for Exchange email, Microsoft Teams chat and channel messages, OneDrive and SharePoint Documents or specify a subset of services.

Select your required option –> Select Next

Microsoft Teams or All

Example of specifying a subset of services, at this stage you can also Include/Excludes Groups, Accounts and Sites.

Select options

Select Find content that contains

For this post, I am looking for PII data that is being shared outside my organisation.

Select Next

Configure Policy

Using the default options here but you can configure option to send incident report to a Distribution List or individuals.
Select Next

Configure Policy

Select “I’d like to test it out first” or Yes, turn it on right away. This is depending if your organisation is ready for the big switch on. The tenant being used in this post is a test tenant will small amount of users.

Press Next

Configure policy

Review your configured settings –> Select Create

Review

Testing – DLP for Micorsoft Teams

So like with all things Microsoft, we have to wait for replication to take place before we can really start testing DLP. Please dont expect your change to work straight away as its needs to work its way through the big Microsoft cloud.

Email Notification that NINO Number has been shared using Microsoft Teams
Warning Message to the User that sent the NINO Number
Email Notification that NINO Number detected in Exchange

So its safe to say DLP is now working within my tenant.

Regards

The Author – Blogabout.Cloud

Configuring Outbound Delivery Routing from Office 365 to Mimecast

Configuring Outbound Delivery Routing from Office 365 to Mimecast

When working with customer environments it is very possible a 3rd party appliance maybe involved and for the purpose of this post I will be directly looking at Mimecast to see how its configured to work with Office 365.

Prerequsities

  • An Office 365 administrator logon with permission to create a send connector.
  • Your internal domains must already be registered with us.
  • A Mimecast administrator logon with at view permission to the Gateway | Accepted Email menu item.

Mimecast recommend that if you are switching MX records, this task must be completed 3 days before changing the MX record to point at Mimecast. The reason for this allows Mimecast to build your Auto Allow list, based on recipients your users send messages to.

This has a positive impact on inbound email delivery speed, because many senders will already be known and consequently not be subject to our greylisting security feature.

Updating the SPF Record for your Domain(s)

You must have an SPF record for the domain(s) registered with Office 365. When implementing Mimecast with Office 365, this record must be updated in the DNS zone for the relevant domain to include the following:

  • Remove: v=spf1 include:spf.protection.outlook.com –all
  • Replace with or add:  v=spf1 include:_netblocks.mimecast.com ~all

Important Note: If your outbound email is temporarily coexisting with Mimecast, you can leave the v=spf1 include:spf.protection.outlook.com –all SPF record. However, it must be removed once all your outbound email is routed through Mimecast.

Configuring Outbound Routing

Important Note: Mimecast has known issue with browsers that are not Internet Explorer and its recommend this process is completed using Internet Explorer only. All other browsers tested have issues.

Recommendation: Disable or remove any other Outbound Send Connectors. Failure to do this means your outbound email still uses these and isn’t routed through us.

Any send connectors used for other purposes (e.g archiving) may still be enabled. If in doubt, consult Mimecast Support.Any send connectors used for other purposes (login archiving) may login be enabled. If in doubt, consult Mimecast Support.

Adding the Office 365 Tenant Domain as an Internal Domain

Your Office 365 tenant domain must be added to the list of internal domains available in the Mimecast Administration Console. See the Configuring Internal Domain / Subdomains page for full details. This enables us to recognize certain auto response messages, where the sender address is not a normal internal domain. This is typically in the format @domain.onmicrosoft.com. Contact the Mimecast Support team if you have queries regarding this step.

Contact the Mimecast Support team if you have queries regarding this step.

Verifying Your Configuration

Once this step is complete, Office 365 must be added to your authorized outbounds as an umbrella account. View the Maintaining Authorized Outbound Addresses page for more information.

To verify that Office 365 is successfully routing email outbound via us:

  1. Log on to the Offic 365 Administration Console.
  2. Select Admin | Exchange
Exchange Admin Centre

Select Mail Flow | Connectors
Create a Connector

Mail Flow | Connectors

Select Office 365 – From Field
Select Partner organization – To Field

Mail Flow Scenari

Enter Name for Connector
Enter Description for Connector – Optional
Ensure “Turn it on” is ticked

Select “Only when email messages are sent to these domains”
Press the ( + )

Type the value * which will allow all outbound email to Mimecast

Press Next

Select “Route email through these smart hosts”
Press the ( + )

Now, depending on your location you will need to use the Smart Host address from the table

RegionOffice 365 Account Hostnames
Americaus-smtp-o365-outbound-1.mimecast.com
Americaus-smtp-o365-outbound-2.mimecast.com
Australiaau-smtp-o365-outbound-1.mimecast.com
Australiaau-smtp-o365-outbound-2.mimecast.com
Europe (Excluding Germany)eu-smtp-o365-outbound-1.mimecast.com
Europe (Excluding Germany)eu-smtp-o365-outbound-2.mimecast.com
Germanyde-smtp-o365-outbound-1.mimecast.com
Germanyde-smtp-o365-outbound-2.mimecast.com
Offshoreje-smtp-o365-outbound-1.mimecast-offshore.com
Offshoreje-smtp-o365-outbound-2.mimecast-offshore.com
South Africaza-smtp-o365-outbound-1.mimecast.co.za
South Africaza-smtp-o365-outbound-2.mimecast.co.zaM

As shown below

Smart Host for Mimecast

Press Next

Select “Always use Transport Layer Security (TLS) to secure this connection (recommended)”
Select “Issued by a trusted certificate authority (CA)


Before pressing next please ensure that you confirm all your configured settings
Press Next

Press the ( + ) this will allow you to validate the connector

Enter an external email to send the test email

Click Validate

If everything is ok and configured correctly you should see a success message

Press save !!! and your all done

Success!!!

Recommendation: Disable or remove any other Outbound Send Connectors, if this is not completed it may cause email to fail as it won’t be routed through Mimecast

But if doing the above seems a bit boring, there’s always PowerShell 🙂

new-outboundconnector -name ConnectorName -smarthosts SmartHostAddress1,SmartHostAddress2 -tlssettings certificatevalidation -recipientdomains * -routeallmessagesviaonpremises $false -connectortype Partner -usemxrecord $false -whatif

or download my script for all Mimecast regions

Set-O365MimecastConnector (13 downloads)

Add your Office 365 domain as an internal domain in Mimecast

The Office 365 domain(s) must be added to the list of internal domain available in the Mimecast Administration console, if this action is missed. Mimecast are unable to recognise auto response message where the send address maybe @domain.onmicrosoft.com. Mimecast have a section about this on their website, please follow the link below.
Configuring Internal Domain / Subdomains 

Verify your configuration

To verify that Office 365 is successfully routing email outbound via us:

  1. Log on to the Administration Console.
  2. Click on the Administration toolbar button.
  3. Select the Message Center | Accepted Messages menu item.

See the Message Center: Accepted Messages page for full details.

You should see messages from your organization’s internal users to external recipients. If you don’t see messages shortly after they’re sent, this indicates a configuration problem on your Office 365 send connector. Double check your configuration. Use the Office 365 Message Trace Tool in the Mail Flow | Message Trace menu of the Exchange Admin Center to help identify the issue.

Important Note: Once this step is complete, Office 365 must be added to your authorized outbounds as an umbrella account. View the Maintaining Authorized Outbound Addresses page for more information.

Regards
The Author – Blogabout.Cloud

Skype for Business Server  CU List

Skype for Business Server CU List

Being a Skype for Business SME, I also find it annoying searching the internet for the correct version number so heres my list

Skype for Business Server 2015

VersionCumulative UpdateKB Article
6.0.9319.537January 2019 (CU8)KB4464355
6.0.9319.534July 2018 (CU7)KB4340904
6.0.9319.516March 2018 (CU6 HF2)KB4086059
6.0.9319.514January 2018 (CU6 HF1)KB4074701
6.0.9319.510December 2017 (CU6)KB4036312
6.0.9319.281May 2017 (CU5)KB4012621
6.0.9319.277February 2017 (CU4 HF1)KB3207506
6.0.9319.272November 2016 (CU4)KB3199093
6.0.9319.259June 2016 (CU3)KB3149227
6.0.9319.235March 2016 (CU2)KB3134260
6.0.9319.102November 2015 (CU1)KB3097645
6.0.9319.88Sep-15KB3098601
6.0.9319.55Jun-15KB3061059
6.0.9319.0RTMNA

Skype for Business Server 2019

VersionCumulative UpdateKB Article
 
 
Get Disabled Users who have an Exchange Mailbox with PowerShell

Get Disabled Users who have an Exchange Mailbox with PowerShell

If there’s one thing most IT department are not great at its removing Exchange Mailboxes for Disabled Users. So here’s a quick Powershell win to determine who within your Exchange organisation has a mailbox and a disabled AD account.

On-Premises Users


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$Mailboxes = Get-Mailbox | where {$_.RecipientTypeDetails -eq 'UserMailbox'}
$Disabled = @()

Foreach ($Mailbox in $Mailboxes) {
    if((Get-ADUser -Identity $Mailbox.SamAccountName).Enabled -eq $False){
        $Disabled += Get-MailboxStatistics $Mailbox.SamAccountName | Select -Property DisplayName,TotalItemSize
    }    
}
$Disabled | Export-Csv -Path $env:userprofile\desktop\DisabledADUserwithMailbox.csv -NoTypeInformation

Cloud Users


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Connect-MsolService
 
  $Mailboxes = Get-Mailbox | Where-Object {$_.RecipientTypeDetails -eq 'UserMailbox'}
  $Disabled = @()

  Foreach ($Mailbox in $Mailboxes) {
    if((Get-msolUser -userprincipalname $Mailbox.userprincipalname).Enabled -eq $False){
        $Disabled += Get-MailboxStatistics $Mailbox.userprincipalname | Select-Object -Property DisplayName,TotalItemSize
    }    
  }
  $Disabled | Export-Csv -Path $env:userprofile\desktop\DisabledAzureADUserwithMailbox.csv -NoTypeInformation

Regards

The Author – Blogabout.Cloud

Method invocation failed because [System.Management.Automation.PSObject] doesn’t contain a method named ‘op_Addition’.

Method invocation failed because [System.Management.Automation.PSObject] doesn’t contain a method named ‘op_Addition’.

While constructing a PowerShell script for gathering information about Distribution Lists within a customers environment, I ran into the following error

Method invocation failed because [System.Management.Automation.PSObject] doesn’t contain a method named ‘op_Addition’. 

ERROR!!!
1

This error was being generated by a missing array within my PowerShell code


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# Call Distribution Lists
$dist = @(Get-DistributionGroup -resultsize unlimited)

# Start Transcript
Start-Transcript -Path $env:USERPROFILE\desktop\DLsandMember.txt

# Report on Distribution List
foreach ($dl in $dist)
{
 
  $count =@(Get-DistributionGroup $dl.samaccountname).count
  $report = New-Object -TypeName PSObject
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'Group Name' -Value $dl.Name
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'samAccountname' -Value $dl.samaccountname
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'Group Type' -Value $dl.grouptype
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'DN' -Value $dl.distinguishedName
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'Manager' -Value $dl.managedby
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'Member Depart Restriction' -Value $dl.memberdepartrestriction
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'Member Join Restriction' -Value $dl.memberjoinrestriction
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'PrimarySMTPAddress' -Value $dl.primarysmtpaddress
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'EmailAddress' -Value $dl.emailaddresses
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'GrantSendOnBehalfto' -Value $dl.GrantSendOnBehalfto
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'EmailAddressPolicyEnabled' -Value $dl.EmailAddressPolicyEnabled
  $report | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name 'Number of Members' -Value $count
  Write-Host ('INFO: {0} has {1} members' -f $dl.name, ($count))
 
  $reportoutput += $report
}

# Stop Transcript
Stop-Transcript

By adding the following lines to my above script I was able to successful export the required information into an Array and dump out to CSV.


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# Array
$reportoutput=@()

Regards

The Author – Blogabout.Cloud

PowerShell – ForEach do  action X or do Y

PowerShell – ForEach do action X or do Y

PowerShell is one of the greatest tools within any IT Professional toolkit, it enables you to do far more than any GUI available to you today. In my life as a Consultant for a Global Microsoft SI (System Integrator), I face challenges every day where PowerShell has come to the rescue. One of the best cmdlet I use in a lot of script is

ForEach which is the alias name of ForEach-Object

Imagine you need to modify an ExtensionAttribute for your entire organization or grant a permission to a subset of users, ask yourself this? How would I do this in a GUI? and the answer would be “with great difficulty or very time consuming”. This is Foreach-Object comes into play, in the below example I need to modify the PrimarySMTPAddress due to special characters being used

Get-DistributionGroup

In order to correct this, I will be using a source CSV file which contains SamAccountName for the identity of each DistributionList and the correct PrimarySMTPAddress.

Source CSV file

Now for the most important element, the powershell script which will be used to modify the PrimarySMTPAddress. The below script has been designed to achieve the required outcome but also includes the ability to;

  • Be ran using native PowerShell for On-Premises Exchange Servers (2007 through to 2019)
  • Be ran against Exchange Online

So as we can see the Foreach command is being used in the following;

  • For each $row within the $csv which is being imported try and get the distribution list using the column heading SamAccountName
    • If the Identity cannot be found the script will move to the catch
    • If the Identity can be found the script will set the distribution list using the column heading PrimarySMTPAddress
  • The catch is alert if there are any unsuccessful attempts at setting the PrimarySMTPAddress

Simples!!

 Clear-Host
$file = "$env:USERPROFILE\OneDrive\Desktop\groups.csv"
$csv = import-csv -Path $file
region Exchange Module SnapIn
# Exchange 2007
#Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.Admin;
# Exchange 2010
#Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.E2010;
# Exchange 2013/2016
#Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.SnapIn;
endregion
Transcript
Start-Transcript -Path $env:USERPROFILE\OneDrive\Desktop\Get-DistributionGroup.txt
Foreach ($row in $csv)
{
try {
Get-DistributionGroup -Identity $row.SamAccountName | Set-DistributionGroup -PrimarySmtpAddress $row.PrimarySmtpAddress
Write-Host 'INFO:' ($row.SamAccountName),'Primary SMTP Address has now been modified to',($row.PrimarySmtpAddress) -BackgroundColor Green
}
catch
{
Write-Host 'ERROR:' ($row.SamAccountName),'Primary SMTP Address has not been modified to',($row.PrimarySmtpAddress) -BackgroundColor Red
}
}
Stop-Transcript
Get-DistributionGroup
Image result for meerkat simples gif

I have included Start-Transcript as this will dump out all Write-Host entry whether they was successful or not.

Regards

The Author – Blogabout.Cloud

Import Exchange PowerShell Module into your PowerShell ISE console

Import Exchange PowerShell Module into your PowerShell ISE console

When working with Exchange there may be a requirement to create a PowerShell script using PowerShell ISE. Even if you run ISE on a Exchange Server you are unable to get the Exchange cmdlet in ISE, so the workaround for this is to use the following command;

  • If you are trying to add the Exchange cmdlets to your client machine you will need to Install the Exchange Management Tools from the Exchange installation media

The command to import the Exchange modules is different for each version – please use the appropriate command below:

Exchange 2007

2007 Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.Admin; 

Exchange 2010

2010 Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.E2010; 

Exchange 2013, 2016, 2019

2013-2019 Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.SnapIn; 

Regards
The Author – Blogabout.Cloud


Going back to CSVDE School -Parameters, Switches you name it… We do Old Skool..

Going back to CSVDE School -Parameters, Switches you name it… We do Old Skool..

Before the joys of Export-CSV there used to be another way of dumping Active Directory data to CSV using again native tooling. In a recent project I have had to rediscover the old ways and go back to school to learn the required switches, which I am now going to share with you all.

Image result for great scott gif

SwitchDescription
-aUserDistinguishedName Password.  If you must use these switches, then treat  -a and -b as a pair.  A likely scenario is that you are logged on as non-administrator and wish to run CSVDE against your Active Directory.  As a non-administrator, you would get an error unless you employ these switches to connect with the correct credentials
-bUserDistinguishedName Password.  If you must use these switches, then treat  -a and -b as a pair.  A likely scenario is that you are logged on as non-administrator and wish to run CSVDE against your Active Directory.  As a non-administrator, you would get an error unless you employ these switches to connect with the correct credentials
-cString1 String2.  This switch replaces all olddomain names in String1 with newdomain names String2.  Could be used to change all dc=oldom distinguished name in the export domain (String1) with dc=newdom of the import domain (String2). 
-dThis is useful filter switch for when you want to export from just one OU.  Use the -d switch to set the root directory for the export.  For example, if you are only interested in an OU called Newport type, CSVDE -f export.csv -d “OU=mycompany,DC=domain,DC=com”.  Note, there are no spaces between domain,DC=com.
-ffilename is a mandatory switch for both import and export.  Simply specify the .csv file for transfer data.  It makes life easier if this file is in the same directory as you issue the CSVDE command.  Here is an export example CSVDE -f export.csv
-gOmits paged searches.   I have never bothered with this switch.
-iSwitches CSVDE to import mode.  For example, CSVDE -i -f export.csv.  Remember that the default mode is export, in which case it’s just plain CSVDE -f FileName.csv 
-jPath Sets the log file directory.  The point of a log file is that it’s permanent where as the -v verbose mode is ephemeral.  -j creates one or two log files.  It always creates a file called csv.log, additionally it creates csv.err if it encounters any errors.
-jTrap: As far as I can see without the -j switch, CSVDE will not create a log file at all.  I mention this as other documentation suggests that you are just setting the path, in my opinion, with -j you are creating the file as well as setting its path.
-kUseful for ignoring simple errors: “Object already exists,” “Constraint violation,” and “Attribute or value already exists.”  I almost always use this switch as part of the CSVDE import command
-lLDAP Attributes.   On the one hand, I think of L for list, on the other hand I think of -l as a column-wise filter.  What this switch does is export only the LDAP properties that you are interested in and ignores the rest of the attributes.  Example CSVDE -f export.csv  -l “DN, objectclass, objectcategory, givenName, sn”.  Note the position of speech marks and commas.
-mAnother column-wise filter.  Omits Active Directory properties such as the ObjectGUID, objectSID, pwdLastSet and samAccountType attributes.

I hope these switches help you, like they have helped me and credit to all the previous bloggers which enabled me to get this list together.

Regards

The Author – Blogabout.Cloud